NEC Australia and Aruba partner up on digital services platform for Clarence Correctional Centre

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The system will monitor inmate activity and safety through a comprehensive surveillance and network outfitting at Australia’s newest and largest prison.

NEC Australia worked closely with Aruba, Serco and Clarence Correctional Centre on the implementation of ICT Systems and managed services including telephony, voice and video gateways, end-point devices, operator services and inmate digital services, all of which will allow Serco to deploy third-party applications, programs and digital content. The digital services platform allows the facility to monitor security and manage WLAN (wireless local area network) and LAN services on-site.

Clarence Correctional Centre is a 1700-bed men and women’s facility employing more than 1600 staff. It opened in June 2020.

“We believe technology can play an important role in enabling society and the implementation of this new digital platform is designed to do just that,” says Milan Djuricic, vice president of managed services at NEC Australia.

Pat Devlin, South Pacific director at Aruba, says, “Working with our key partners, we are proud to have delivered a solution that delivers state-of-the-art technology, connectivity and security at the facility. In today’s data-driven age, security and centralised visibility are critical to a strong network. With NEC Australia, we are driving innovation and providing staff with the digital tools needed to identify and resolve problems before they occur.”

As part of the digital services platform, inmates who practise acceptable social behaviours will also be granted access to self-service technology such as secure networks, managed family communication and internal facility-based cashless banking resources in an effort to support their rehabilitation and prepare for release back into the community.

Djuricic expresses NEC Australia’s desire to equip offenders for a “seamless and positive re-entry into society upon their release”, in what he describes as a “win-win for everyone”.

Image source: Infrastructure NSW

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